Canada and Cannabis: Freedom or Boundaries?

Canada and Cannabis: Freedom or Boundaries?

Canada and Cannabis Freedom or boundaries. Oh Canada- we finally did it after decades the government finally lifted its hold and made cannabis legal country wide. The first G7 country.

Canada and Cannabis: Freedom or Boundaries?
Canada and Cannabis: Freedom or Boundaries?

In so many ways this is a time for celebrations, and for others it’s a time to rethink rental/work agreements. Many speculate on the new rules. And questions like Can a homeowner really ban a legal drug from their rental home? And can you still get fired for being high at work? Legal pot freedom! But maybe not as free as you would think.

As of October 17 the law will then state – Canadians can now legally carry 30 grams of cannabis and share up to 30 grams of legal cannabis with another adult. So can you really get fired at work? yes and no. According to work policy – it’s not as simple as you think. A breach of policy can be as simple as “ the boss taking his/her employees out for a few drinks”. Moving forward with the new law. Anyone running a business must state very clearly. That anyone using anything that impairs themselves at a job site (cannabis) – Must inform the manager. In America, Many companies have opened their floors to smoking up on the job. Some businesses even say “ if it helps them get the work done were fine with it”.

Canada and Cannabis: A Rather Large Debate!

Another rather large debate on acceptable or not is the 4 plants to every home. Most “stoners” have already tried growing a plant in their home. And if you haven’t i’ll let you know it’s hard work takes up alot of energy humid and time consuming. Most homeowners worry is their house turning into a growop. On the economic side of things. Growing 4 plants in home will raise the price of electricity and power. Making utilities go up. This added bill to renters could cause many financial problems. For people who use cannabis to help them stabilize their health. This could be a cheaper & easier route.

canada and cannabis
Canada and Cannabis
Source: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-44543286

So are we really free? Financial battles, work expectations, let’s not forget the designated smoking areas for cannabis. For more stoners the dream of sitting down in our favorite coffee shop. Lighting up a J and enjoying good coffee with friends, is OUR freedom dream. BUT this is a movement forward and we celebrate this notion. We continue to stand together, giving the best education on cannabis, and continue to move towards a FREE cannabis country.

Writer: Megan Thiessen

Lethbridge Ab Canada

Canadian Cannabis Laws – The First G7 Country To Legalize

canadian-cannabis-laws

Canadian Cannabis Laws- The First G7 Country To Legalize 

BIll C-45 was passed to the house of commons early July- it will be the first of many passes between the two parties as Canada gets ready for the legalization of cannabis. There are many countries that have legalized the use of cannabis, although Canada will be the first G7 country to legalize nationwide. What makes Canada a G7 country and what is so fascinating about this place.

A G7 country is one of the “7 advanced nations” such as; France, Germany, Italy, Japan United Kingdom United States. These have the most advanced economies in the world. To pause here, cannabis use is legal in America, BUT America is not cannabis legal nationwide. Over 20 states are legal but, not all 20 plus states are legal for open use. Many of them are only legal for medical purposes.

Justin Trudeau

The Canadian bill was approved in the upper house, and is now sent back down to the House Of Commons where ot will be reviewed. Here is what we call the “bill dance”. The bill came with only 12 amendments & now has over 40 “potential” amendments. This bill will go back and forth until both parties are happy with the outcome. Something that is said to be done before July 1 2018. Will that happen? We are all questioning that part. One of the amendments is the number of plants you can grow in home.

Provinces Manitoba and Quebec

Manitoba and Quebec want to ban the number of in home plants to zero, in BC a few laws already exist, being a more lenient provence. Lenient as in Vancouver is known for its 4/20 annual event, as well as its many markets on the island as well as on the “mainland”. A few rules are. ( many provinces are also moving to these laws) No one under the age of 19 can have cannabis on them ( legal drinking age in BC and most provinces is 19). Cannabis can be publicly used in places where tobacco smoking/vaping is allowed ( some provinces want to ban public use completely). You can grow up to 4 plants in home.

Canadian Cannabis Legalization

Canada is the leading fastest growing country in the G7 – with the biggest metropolitan areas – Toronto Vancouver & Montreal. More than one- third of Canada’s population call these cities home. As a G7 country we are moving fast and forward with new growth. Turning all eyes on us as we play the “ bill dance”. Canada is known as an “melting pot” for cannabis connoisseurs. Cannabis apparel is showing up in all provinces in Canada.

Canada, a place where people all over the world come to make this ever growing country home. We are known for our beautiful rocky mountains our wide spread of the prairie farm lands and our many national parks. Canada is a beautiful country fast paced and never stops growing. We are a G7 country through ad though. It’s what makes us special and unique. Although this “ bill dance” is confusing,frustrating and time consuming we are all excited to be the first G7 country to make cannabis legal nationwide.

CANADA-LOVE

Writer:
Megan Thiessen
Canada, Lethbridge, AB

2018 Cannabis in Canada – What You Need To Know

2018 Cannabis in Canada

2018 Cannabis in Canada – Over the years, cannabis has been an illegal drug in Canada.

Like always, change happens over time, and cannabis in Canada is now in the eye of it. Justin Trudoue, prime minister of Canada has set a date of July 1, 2018: cannabis ruled as a legal substance. Having the opportunity to speak out about this subject, I looked out to see how people felt of this new change. I prepared myself for this study wondering what others would have to say about this. It would be nice to say that I chatted with the population of Canada, but that is not a realistic endeavor. So I chatted with the ones I could, and researched the ones I couldn’t.

The country was pretty divided over cannabis in Canada. No one really seamed to make that much of a fuss.

But the ones that did had some rather insightful questions and problems that this new law would create. And they were: economy & justice system.

As an active user myself, I could see why the country was split over cannabis in Canada. For me, the concept was quite easy. Smoke it or don’t, respect everyone’s idea about it. And for the most part others seemed to believe in the same thing. This legalization isn’t new many countries are changing. And for the most part it’s going quite well.

For me, I could never see any financial gains to taxing the plant. The health benefits out weighted the finical side of things. Being 25 and a single mum, I use it more for medication than recreational use. In my past life I used it more as recreational then medication. All the same I enjoy the smell the taste and the feeling it gives me. Most of everyone I chatted with felt the same. A few would rather eat the herb but that was niter here nor they’re for this topic.

2018 Cannabis in Canada weed leaf
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A senior economist at CIBC World Markets extrapolated from Colorado’s sales figures to come up with a $10 billion estimate of the Canadian demand for legal cannabis, and projected provincial and federal governments could rake in $5 billion per year in tax revenue. Chris Damases editor of the BCMI report had this to say

“I don’t think the numbers are that high. “Many people who write about cannabis have a vested interest in promoting the industry.”

Now again speaking as a user I see a beauty and lots of others see a market in the plant. Us “stoners” have even started to master the craft of rolling joints into art. Check out shesmokesjoints (instagram) her page is filled with amazing hand crafted rolled joints, and beautiful video edits of her smoke tricks. Not only is she a beautiful person but also she makes smoking pot look well… beautiful. She isn’t the only fellow user to take this by storm and enter a whole new world of writing editing and photography. Many other users and non-users photograph people smoking started pages even opened their own dispensaries. Just growing the plant is art enough. It’s not hard to see that there is a very large market for this.

But what Chris Damases is talking about is not the investment of fellow users turning pot into a job. It’s the government taxing the product and the issue of what party gets the piece of the pie, so to speak. We all know the government is rather money hungry. A lot of it comes down to money. And how much will I get. . So just how much will we be seeing come off? To the little information that was allowed to be reveled to the public. I found this:

“Under the current proposal, the federal government would impose an excise tax of $1 per gram of marijuana or 10 per cent of the final retail price, whichever is higher, with half the revenue going to provinces and territories”

Reading more into it, we’ve have also found a lot of words like “need more information” and “ need to go over the numbers.” Nothing more has been released on this subject. Whatever the numbers may be, the government doesn’t feel ready or want to tell all.

Over in Québec Canada,  Union president Mathieu Lavoie from Quebec Canada. Hopes more resources will be in place at correctional facilities to handle the legalization of marijuana, because guards are worried about increased violence. (Radio-Canada) he also states ” Violence in prison is often linked to debts, whether that’s drugs or gambling,” Benson said. Benson also stated “If we can just make smoking a privilege and ask people, ‘you want to smoke? You have to make some effort in your rehabilitation process,'” . I can imagine that legalizing will bring out some angry inmates. For criminal Justin lawyer Andrew Barbackie stated: “I would foresee for the first couple of years it’s going to be a nightmare, really.”

The conclusion on cannabis in Canada

The reality of it is: change is never easy. And I expect with the first two years we will be experimenting with all kinds of ideas on how the system should work. From how much you can have on you at one time. To who much you can grow. The tools they use to detect diving under the influence. A good friend of mine questioned me this “ can you really get an appropriate reading from a road side test not every body is the same”. an amazing point to be made. I hold my weed much different then my partner my brother and my girlfriends. Is it really fair to state a rule of thumb when not one human is alike? All questions we will receive the answer to as the months press on. As for now Canada waits penitently. And the stoners keep smoking.

Author: Megan Thiessen

For more information, check out our section on current marijuana laws

Stoner News; New Hampshire May Decriminalize Cannabis

Stoner-News

Stoner News; New Hampshire May Decriminalize Cannabis

In regards to cannabis, New Hampshire is behind it’s North East neighbors. The surrounding states have passed laws to fully legalize cannabis or are on their way to doing so. Vermont legislature just approved legal cannabis. Both Maine and Massachusetts voters passed legalization measures within the last year. The area around New Hampshire are slowly turning green. New Hampshire has a chance to hang on to the Green Rush by passing the current decriminalization bill.

The New Hampshire House has voted numerous times over the last decade to decriminalize cannabis. The Senate shot the bill down every time. That is, until last Thursday. The Senate reached a compromise with the bill that the House presented. According to the bill, those above the age of 18 possessing three-quarters of an ounce of cannabis would be guilty of a violation.The first and second offenses would carry a fine of $100. The third offense could present fines of up to $300. If one were to be slapped with a fourth charge, they would receive a Class B misdemeanor. Police officers would no lonnew hampshire stoner newsger be able to arrest citizens for cannabis possession. The bill requires fine money collected from cannabis violations be deposited into the state’s fund to combat alcohol and substance abuse.

New Hampshire senators have very split views on cannabis.

Some, such as Senator Martha Hennessy understand that with current laws are outdated. New Hampshire residents can lose everything from their children to their jobs to their homes if found in possession of cannabis. Extreme penalties include not being able to adopt children or even losing the right to vote in elections. Hennessy also believes that the “gateway drug” myth is false. “Marijuana is a safer alternative,” she persisted. Other senators unfortunately don’t share her view.

Sen. Bill Gannon wanted to lower the amount allowed from three quarters of an ounce to half. He doesn’t agree that legalization of cannabis could help the opiate crisis. The city of Manchester, NH is in the top percentile of cities with severe heroin addiction issues. His argument was that decriminalization will set back the work done to right the heroin epidemic He also exclaimed that, “My greatest concern facing this legislation would be the potential consequences it could hold for our youth. This is obviously the wrong message to send to my children and the children of New Hampshire.”

Stoner News; New Hampshire May Decriminalize Cannabis

Another concern of Gannon’s on Thursday was the stoned driver. There is no way for officers to officially tell if a driver is stoned or not. Gannon claims that a “family can be wiped out by a stoned driver who a police officer let go with a violation.” Alcohol still presents far more of a problem than cannabis behind the wheel. Heroin is also more common in traffic accidents than cannabis. Two years ago in New Hampshire a man overdosed on heroin while driving. He was behind the wheel of his car in the middle of an intersection during rush hour. The police didn’t arrest him. He walked away after receiving Narcan. Stoned drivers are out there every day, commuting to work while jamming out to their favorite songs.

Other senators feel that decriminalizing the plant will hurt the state’s ability to attract business. Government officials should be doing everything they can to draw people to the small state. Liquor stores off of the highways don’t count. New Hampshire’s most well known monument took a dive a couple years ago. The state does have beautiful landscapes but so do Maine and Vermont. Maine and Vermont also have legal, high quality cannabis, which will draw away younger tourists. Younger residents of New Hampshire are leaving the state, looking for greener pastures.

Individual states are changing their cannabis laws. Colorado and Washington have not collapsed. The states are doing extremely well with the influx of new money. The decriminalization bill in New Hampshire is a small step. It is a move in the right direction. Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont may see a steady influx of New Hampshire residents. The Granite State still has a while to go before it’s citizens get access to legal cannabis.

 

 

Five Ridiculous Laws Pertaining To Cannabis

Five Ridiculous Laws Pertaining To Cannabis

Some cannabis laws are in place to keep us safe, but these laws seem to come from a long ago forgotten time when you hand cranked up your jalopy and drove to the box social with your sweetie. Thankfully, the laws are beginning to change. With the help of cannabis advocates everywhere but unfortunately, some of these are still around. Always remember to be careful when smoking in places where marijuana might not be popular. Be sure that you know the laws in different states when you visit. You never know when the cops will pull you over.

In Texas, it’s ok to give someone life in prison for marijuana.

Tyrone Brown was a teenager that attempted to steal a man’s wallet containing $2. Tyrone gave back the money and the man’s wallet when he realized what he was doing was wrong. “Luckily” after some support from the press Tyrone was released after serving 17 years. Then there’s the case of Jacob Lavoro, who was caught selling edibles (again in Texas). Police claimed Lavoro was running a low level edibles operation. He was initially charged with first degree felony possession and intent to distribute. These crimes carry a harsh sentence up to life in prison. The charges were dropped. The idea that such low level crimes can carry such a harsh punishment is frightening to say the least.

In Texas, possession of anything less than two ounces is punishable by up to 180 days in prison. Plus a ridiculous fine of up to $2,000. The sale of any amount of marijuana over fifty pounds can land you up ninety-nine years in jail.

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@teamlandonandcannabis

Marijuana is illegal in Texas but still taxable.

The idea here is to “tax” any person found in possession of marijuana. If they have already purchased a tax stamp. Since marijuana is still illegal, the only way to get the stamp is to already be in possession of the substance. The government found this to be unconstitutional on a federal level yet it remains in effect to this day in Texas. The fact is, they are double tapping you with fines and nothing is being done about it.

Get caught in Oklahoma with any amount, go to jail for a year.

In the state of Oklahoma, getting busted with cannabis (any amount of the stuff) can land you in jail for a year. If you get caught for a second time, again with any amount, no matter how small, you can get jail time for up to ten years. Having any sort of concentrate will get you in even deeper trouble, especially if you get caught with it in your car. Distributing, transporting, dispensing, or possession with intent can get you life behind bars, along with a hefty fine of $20,000. Manufacturing concentrates will also potentially get you life in jail, plus a fine of around $50,000.

Internal possession of alcohol and/or cannabis in NH counts as straight possession.

Most people believe that if you get stopped by the police with drugs or alcohol, ingesting the substance will make the situation better. Since the illicit substance is no longer “on your person”, the cops can’t find it, right? Wrong. In the state of New Hampshire (as well as a few others), the cops can still bust you for possessing these substances even when they’re in your stomach. So if you ever run in to trouble in New Hampshire, remembering that eating what you have on you isn’t a surefire way to avoid trouble.

This basically harmless plant is a Schedule 1 drug in the eyes of the Federal Government.

Cannabis is in the same class as heroin, and as such the use, cultivation, possession and sale is illegal. So far 18 states have passed medical cannabis laws making it legal in the state, they still carry the risk of being raided and robbed of their hard work. As far as the government is concerned, weed is no bueno. Thankfully, more advocates are pushing for the Feds to remove themselves from the business of medical marijuana laws within allowing states.

Five Ridiculous Laws Pertaining To Cannabis

Washington Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-washington

marijuana-laws-washingtonThe Law
On November 6th, 2012, Washington state voters passed Initiative 502 with a 55% majority. This initiative legalized marijuana for recreational use. On December 6th, adults over 21 won’t violate state law if they possess up to an ounce of marijuana for personal use.


Conditions
I-502 authorizes the sale of up to one ounce of marijuana to anyone over 21 in Washington State by retailers licensed through the Liquor Control Board.


Possession/Cultivation
Adults may possess up to one ounce of weed. Possession of larger amounts, and the unauthorized growing of marijuana remains illegal in Washington.

Washington Marijuana Laws

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Vermont Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-vermont

marijuana-laws-vermontThe Law
Senate Bill 76, the “Act Relating to Marijuana Use by Persons with Severe Illness” was approved on May 26th, 2004. Gov. James Douglas allowed the act to pass into law unsigned.


Conditions
Cancer, AIDS, positive status for HIV, multiple sclerosis, or the treatment of these conditions if the disease or the treatment results in severe, persistent, and intractable symptoms; or a disease, medical condition, or its treatment that is chronic, debilitating and produces severe, persistent, and one or more of the following intractable symptoms: cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe pain or nausea or seizures.


Possession/Cultivation
Patient’s may grow no more than two flowering marijuana plants and seven immature plants. Dried marijuana cannot exceed two ounces. All others are considered immature.

 Vermont Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-map

Tell us what you think about these laws and how they might effect you and your state you live in. Cannabis legalization if on the rise. With a list a states scheduled to legalize this year, they will be the ones showing the rest the way. By now parties of both sides should have enough evidence that cannabis is not a schedule 1 drug. The push continues and is such a long drag, but with voters showing up the war may end soon.

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Rhode Island Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-rhode-islandThe Law
Senate Bill 0710 was approved by the House and Senate, and was vetoed by the Governor. However, the veto was over-ridden by the House and Senate. On January 3rd, 2006 the Edward O. Hawkins and Thomas C. Slater Medical Marijuana Act was passed.


Conditions
Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, or the treatment of these conditions; A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment that produces cachexia or wasting syndrome; severe, debilitating, chronic pain; severe nausea; seizures, including but not limited to, those characteristic of epilepsy; severe and persistent muscle spasms, including but not limited to, those characteristic of multiple sclerosis or Crohn’s disease; or agitation of Alzheimer’s Disease; or any other medical condition or its treatment approved by the state Department of Health.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients can have 12 marijuana plants or up to two and a half ounces of dried marijuana. Caregivers may possess up to five ounces of dried marijuana and no more than 24 marijuana plants in order to provide/supply for their patients.

 Rhode Island Marijuana Laws

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Oregon Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-oregonThe Law
Ballot Measure 67 was approved by 55% of voters on Nov. 3, 1998. The law removes criminal penalties on using, possessing and growing marijuana by patients who obtain a recommendation from their doctor saying marijuana may relieve their symptoms.


Conditions
Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for HIV/AIDS, or treatment for these conditions; A medical condition or treatment for a medical condition that produces cachexia, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, including seizures caused by epilepsy, or persistent muscle spasms, including spasms caused by multiple sclerosis.


Possession/Cultivation
Patient’s may possess up to six mature marijuana plants and 24 ounces of dried marijuana. Patient’s may cultivate a combined total of no more than 18 immature plants.

 Oregon Marijuana Laws

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New Mexico Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-new-mexico

marijuana-laws-new-mexicoThe Law
Senate Bill 523, “The Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act” was approved March 13th, 2007 by the House and Senate. The bill removes criminal penalties on the use and possession of marijuana by patients who need it to relieve severe medical conditions or their treatments.


Conditions
Severe chronic pain, painful peripheral neuropathy, intractable nausea/vomiting, severe anorexia/cachexia, hepatitis C infection, Crohn’s disease, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), cancer, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with intractable spasticity, epilepsy, HIV/AIDS, and hospice patients.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients can possess up to six ounces of dried marijuana, four mature plants and 12 immature plants. Dried marijuana does not include seeds, stalks or roots.

 New Mexico Marijuana Laws

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New Jersey Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-new-jersey

marijuana-laws-new-jerseyThe Law
Senate Bill 119 was signed into law by Governor Jon Corzine on January 18th, 2010. The law protects patients who use marijuana to aid medical conditions. This also applies to their doctor, care givers and those who produce and supply marijuana. By ruling under this bill no one can be arrested or prosecuted.


Conditions
Seizure disorder, including epilepsy, intractable skeletal muscular spasticity, glaucoma; severe or chronic pain, severe nausea or vomiting, cachexia, or wasting syndrome resulting from HIV/AIDS or cancer; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), multiple sclerosis, terminal cancer, muscular dystrophy, or inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn’s disease.


Possession/Cultivation
Doctors decide how much marijuana to prescribe the patient. The patient gives that information to a treatment center to be filled. No more than two ounces can be purchased in a thirty day period.

 New Jersey Marijuana Laws

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Join the revolution and get involved. Everyone here at stonerdays is reaching out to all 50 states in support. Any hands on deck that we can get will help greatly. To many of our brothers and sisters are being prosecuted daily. The act of enjoying a plant is absurd and needs to be handled immediately. We will not stop our fight until the whole world has been rectified of this insane governmental movement. Here in California we expect a legalization to be in full effect by 2017.

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Nevada Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-nevada

The Law
Ballot Question 9 was approved on Nov. 7th, 2000 by 65% of Nevada stoner voters. The ballot removes criminal penalties on using, possessing and growing marijuana, as long as patients have written documentation from their doctor that marijuana may aid his or her condition.


Conditions
AIDS; cancer; glaucoma; and any medical condition or treatment to a medical condition that produces cachexia, persistent muscle spasms or seizures, severe nausea or pain. Other conditions are subject to approval by the health division of the state Department of Human Resources.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients may legally possess up to one ounce of dried marijuana, three flowering plants, and four immature plants.

 Nevada Marijuana Laws

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Montana Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-montana

marijuana-laws-montanaThe Law
Initiative 148 was approved by 62% of Montana voters on November 2nd, 2004. The initiative grants patients the right to medical marijuana with a doctors certification.


Conditions
Cancer, glaucoma, or positive status for HIV/AIDS, or the treatment of these conditions; a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment that produces cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, including seizures caused by epilepsy, or severe or persistent muscle spasms, including spasms caused by multiple sclerosis or Chrohn’s disease; or any other medical condition or treatment for a medical condition adopted by the department by rule.


Possession/Cultivation
Patient’s may possess six marijuana plants and up to one ounce of dried marijuana.

 Montana Marijuana Laws

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Michigan Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-michigan

marijuana-laws-michiganThe Law
Proposal 1, the “Michigan Medical Marijuana Act” was approved by 63% of Michigan voters on Nov. 4th, 2008. The law became effective December 4th, 2008.


Conditions
Approved for treatment of debilitating medical conditions, defined as cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, agitation of Alzheimer’s disease, nail patella, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, epilepsy, muscle spasms, and multiple sclerosis.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients may possess up to two and one-half ounces of dried marijuana and twelve marijuana plants. Plants must be enclosed and locked. Plants can only be kept if the patient hasn’t specified a primary caregiver to cultivate for them.

 Michigan Marijuana Laws

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Massachusetts Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-massachusetts

marijuana-laws-massachusettsThe Law
Ballot Question 3 was approved on Nov. 6th, 2012 by 63% of voters. The law states that there should be no punishment under state law for patients, physicians, care givers and treatment centers due to the medicinal use of marijuana.


Conditions
Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and other conditions as determined in writing by a qualifying patient’s physician.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients may possess no more than a sixty day supply of dried marijuana. The state can issue a cultivation registration if a treatment center is not easily accessible due to location, financial hardship or physical incapacity.

 MassachusettsMarijuana Laws

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Maine Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-maine

marijuana-laws-maineThe Law
Ballot Question 2 was approved by 61% of voter’s on Nov. 2nd, 1999. It removes criminal penalties on using, possessing and growing marijuana by patients who possess an oral or written opinion from their doctor that they might benefit from the medical use of marijuana.


Conditions
Epilepsy and other disorders characterized by seizures; glaucoma; multiple sclerosis and other disorders characterized by muscle spasticity; and nausea or vomiting as a result of AIDS or cancer chemotherapy.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients may keep up to one and a quarter ounce of dried marijuana and no more than six marijuana plants.

 Maine Marijuana Laws

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Hawaii Marijuana Laws

marijuana-laws-hawaii

marijuana-laws-hawaiiThe Law
Senate Bill 862 was signed into law by Gov. Ben Cayetano on June 14th, 2000. The state bill removes criminal penalties for using, possessing and growing marijuana by patients with a signed statement from their physician.


Conditions
Cancer,glaucoma, positive status for HIV/AIDS; A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment that produces cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, including those characteristic of epilepsy, or severe and persistent muscle spasms, including those characteristic of multiple sclerosis or Crohn’s disease.


Possession/Cultivation
The amount of marijuana that may be possessed can’t exceed three mature marijuana plants, four immature marijuana plants, and up to one ounce of dried marijuana.

 Hawaii Marijuana Laws

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Delaware Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-delawareThe Law
Senate Bill 17 was signed into law by Gov. Jack Markell on May 13th, 2011. Under this law, a patient is protected from arrest if their physician certifies in writing that the patient would receive therapeutic benefit from medical marijuana.


Conditions
Approved for treatment of debilitating medical conditions, defined as cancer, HIV/AIDS, de-compensated cirrhosis, ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder; or a medical condition that produces wasting syndrome, severe debilitating pain that has not responded to other treatments for more than three months or for which other treatments produced serious side effects, severe nausea, seizures, or severe and persistent muscle spasms.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients 18 and older may possess up to six ounces of marijuana with a doctor’s written recommendation. No center may dispense more than three ounces to the same person in a two week period. The law doesn’t allow cultivation.

 Delaware Marijuana Laws

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Connecticut Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-connecticutThe Law
On May 31st, 2012, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy signed into law HB5389. It was approved by both the House and Senate. HB5389 states “A qualifying patient shall register with the Department of Consumer Protection, prior to engaging in the palliative use of marijuana”. Anyone who has a valid registration certificate, will not be subject to arrest or prosecution. Patients must reside in Connecticut and be at least 18 years of age.


Conditions
“Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immune deficiency syndrome [HIV/AIDS], Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity, epilepsy, cachexia, wasting syndrome, Crohn’s disease, posttraumatic stress disorder, or… any medical condition, medical treatment or disease approved by the Department of Consumer Protection…”


Possession/Cultivation
Patient’s may possess enough marijuana to reasonably medicate them for up to one month. This amount is determined by the Department of Consumer Protection.

 Connecticut Marijuana Laws

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Colorado Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-coloradoThe Law
The Colorado Marijuana Legalization Amendment, or Amendment 64, was approved on the November 6th, 2012 ballot in Colorado. The measure legalized marijuana in the state for recreational use by those over the age of 21. The amendment also allows the state to regulate retail sales of the drug. In 2006 a similar ballot was defeated.


Conditions
At least 21 years of age.


Possession/Cultivation
Anyone over 21 can legally possess up to an ounce of marijuana for recreational use. Anyone over 21 may cultivate up to six marijuana plants, however only three plants may be flowering at once.

Colorado Marijuana Laws

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California Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-californiaThe Law
On November 5th, 1996, 56% of stoner voter’s approved Proposition 215. The proposition removed state level criminal penalties on use, possession and cultivation of marijuana. Patients need to possess a “written or oral recommendation” from their doctor stating they “would benefit from medical marijuana.”


Conditions
AIDS, anorexia, arthritis, cachexia, cancer, chronic pain, glaucoma, migraine, persistent muscle spasms, including spasms associated with multiple sclerosis, seizures, including seizures associated with epilepsy, severe nausea; Other chronic or persistent medical symptoms.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients and their caregivers can possess no more than eight ounces of marijuana or six marijuana plants. Prop 215 also allows counties to approve and maintain local ordinances permitting patients to keep more than allowed under the state guidelines.

 California Marijuana Laws

Arizona Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-arizonaThe Law
On November 2nd, 2010, 50.13% of voter’s approved Proposition 203, the “Arizona Medical Marijuana Act”. Patients with a doctors certification may possess and use marijuana. Marijuana can grown, or be obtained from a registered nonprofit dispensary.


Conditions
Cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C, ALS, Crohn’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures (including epilepsy), severe or persistent muscle spasms (including multiple sclerosis).


Possession/Cultivation
Patients and care givers can have up to two and a half ounces of marijuana every fourteen days. Patients who live 25 miles or more from a dispensary are allowed to grow up to 12 marijuana plants as long as they are enclosed and locked.

 Arizona Marijuana Laws

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Alaska Marijuana Laws

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marijuana-laws-alaskaThe Law
On November 3rd, 1998, 58% of Alaskan voter’s approved the removal of criminal penalties on using, possessing and growing marijuana as long as they have documentation from their doctor stating they would benefit from medical marijuana. The law became effective March 4th, 1999.


Conditions
Conditions for Doctor approval include Cachexia, cancer, chronic pain, epilepsy and other disorders characterized by seizures, glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, multiple sclerosis and other disorders characterized by muscle spasticity, and nausea. Other conditions are subject to approval by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services.


Possession/Cultivation
Patients can have up to one ounce of dried marijuana, and may cultivate six marijuana plants. Of those six, only three may be mature. Alaska has a confidential state-run patient registry that issues identification cards to qualifying patients.

 Alaska Marijuana Laws

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